Advertise Here

Email

(Contact Dave)

Join the Registry

If you own a frame or bike built by Dave Moulton, email details to list it on the registry website at www.davemoultonregistry.com 

Dave Moulton

More pictures of my past work can be viewed in the Photo Gallery on the Owner's Registry. A link is in the navigation bar at the top

Bicycle Accident Lawyer

Zero Tolerance for Spam

  I can delete Spam a lot quicker than it can be posted. Comments are checked daily, even on old articles, and any with irrelevant advertising links are deleted. Blatant or persistant Spammers are blocked. 

Dave Moulton

 

 

 

Powered by Squarespace
Sunday
Mar252007

Cord Whipping Handlebars


My profound thanks go out to Ben Spencer from Seattle who sent me a really nice pair of Cinelli, Giro d’Italia handlebars to replace the ones I had bent.

I was up at the crack of dawn this morning to install them before heading out for a twenty-five mile ride. I decided to stay with the blue tape because it goes with my blue tires.

After wrapping the bars, normally I would have done what many people do, and reach for the black electricians tape to finish off. However, this time I decided to spend a little extra time and finish off by cord whipping with some black cord.

If you haven’t tried this, it is not that difficult. Make a loop with the cord, and hold it with one hand under the bars while you start winding the chord over it. Once you get a couple of turns over the loop, it will hold itself in place.

Start at the center ferule and wind back over the tape. I usually stop the tape and cut it about a quarter inch short of the ferule, otherwise it gets too bulky with the cord over it. You want the cord to sit neatly against the ferule so that you start winding nice and square.

When you have enough cord to cover the end of the tape, (Usually about an inch.) put the end of the cord through the loop and pull on the other end. Don’t pull it all the way trough, but stop when the end is tucked neatly under the winding.

Trim the ends of the cord with a sharp knife, and apply several coats of clear urethane over the cord to waterproof and to help seal it so it doesn’t come unraveled. It is advisable to place some masking tape either side of the cord whipping so you don’t get urethane all over the ferule and handlebar tape.

I had a hard time finding black cord, and what I found was quite thin. It would have been easier and probably have looked neater if the cord was a little thicker.

It occurred to me after; I could have used fine round string and painted over it with black paint instead of using clear urethane. You can buy tiny jars of enamel paint at the hobby shop in any color you wish.

Wednesday
Mar212007

Aligning Handlebars

It can sometimes be difficult to get your handlebars aligned square with the front wheel; especially if the handlebar stem is tapered. Here is the way I always do it.

Hold the square end of a twelve-inch steel ruler against the center ferule of the handlebars, this gives you the long edge of the ruler to sight up with the edge of the front tire.

Sunday
Mar182007

100 Blogs

This is the 100th. Blog I have written since I started in November 2005; it is fitting that it should be on a happy note.

Today I went for a modest ten-mile ride on my re-assembled bike, just 93 days after my accident last December. I might have gone a little further but it was extremely windy and I didn’t want to over-do it on my first ride.

There was one set back during re-assembly; I switched handlebar stems from 11 cm. to a 9 cm. In doing so, I noticed my handlebars were bent from the accident; I had failed to notice it before. As you can see from the picture, (Left) the right side, nearest the camera, is pushed back and the bottom of the drops are no longer parallel.

It was no wonder that my right hand was so badly bruised in the accident. My hand was on the brake hood at the time I hit the side of the SUV. The impact through my hand was enough to twist the handlebars.

I realized finding a replacement handlebar would delay the re-build for at least a week, even two. Initially this was a huge disappointment, then I decided to go ahead and as a purely temporary measure make do with the damaged bar. My first few rides are going to be very gentle, close to home, and I won’t be putting a lot of stress on the handlebars.

In the mean time I am now on the look out for a pair of Cinelli “Giro de Italia” 24 - 40 or similar. 26.4 ferrule.

This frame being a centimeter smaller than my previous one, my stem is a centimeter lower, but I now have 2 cm. shorter reach due to switching to a shorter stem. The position felt comfortable this morning when I rode, I had felt a little stretched on my other bike.

I had previously set the bike up the same as I had it since the 1970s. I have come to realize that I have to make concessions for a body that is not as young and supple as it once was.

Wednesday
Mar142007

Got my Replacement Frame

My replacement frame arrived on Monday. It was shipped from San Francisco via US Postal Service on Friday. I tracked it online that evening and it was still in the Bay Area; it showed up at my door in Charleston, South Carolina Monday afternoon. Pretty fast service I would say for coming clear across the country.

The frame is a 51cm. Fuso that I built around 1985. It has been repainted in a red powder-coat finish. Yesterday I stripped my damaged bike down with the exception of the bottom bracket and crank set. I don’t have the tools at this time to do that myself, so I took both frames over to Charleston Bicycle Company, my LBS on Savannah Hwy. to have them complete the switch.

The frame came with a new Campagnolo Record headset, so there was no need to change that over. I will be finishing the re-build this coming weekend, and I’ll be back on the road. I am ready and looking forward to it immensely. Watch this spot for more pictures later.

Monday
Mar122007

The Haunted Fish Tank


Scientists tell us a goldfish has a memory that lasts only three seconds; how they figured that one out, I don’t know. Did they sit and talk to a goldfish, ask it questions, while holding a stopwatch?

I am beginning to wonder if some Internet users have the attention span of a goldfish.

I have a little thing on this blog called Statcounter. It gives me useful information on people visiting this blog.

Don’t worry, it doesn’t tell me who you are, where you live, or what you had for dinner last night. However, it does tell me how you arrived here, search keywords used and how long you stayed once you got here.

Many people arrive here via a Google search, and what I find frustrating as hell strange is when people ask a specific question, arrive on the page that has the exact answer, and stay less than three seconds.

For example, one recent visitor got here by using these keywords “replacing tube lugged bike.” Which led him to this page. There on the screen before his very eyes, step by step instructions on how to replace a tube in a lugged frame. Length of visit: 0 seconds. Anything under three seconds registers as zero.

“What bike frame size for my height?” is a question that gets Googled many times, and will land you on this page. You would think the words “Frame Sizing” in the title would be a clue to a person that maybe they had landed on a page that might have some answers for them. Length of visit: 0 seconds.

I could go on and on, but I’ll just do one more. “Centering side pull brakes” will land you here. Simple instructions, 107 words and 2 photographs. The only way it could be any easier would be if I came round to your house and showed you how to do it. Length of visit: 0 seconds.

In my native England, we sometimes refer to the television as “The haunted fish tank.” I think that name would be more apt for the PC. The only difference is the fish are on the outside, looking in. Maybe some people really do have the attention span of a goldfish, and by the time they click from Google to here, they have forgotten the question.

The Internet is supposed to make us smarter, sometimes I wonder. The information is there, but until scientists come up with a USB cable that plugs directly into our brain, it requires that we read the information to benefit from it.

In writing this piece, I came to realize this strange aspect of human behavior is really a metaphor for life. The answer to any question, any problem we may have in life is right there within ourselves. The Universal Intelligence, which is our intelligence, knows the answer.

We search for answers, but then we try too hard to find the solution. Instead of slowing down and allowing ourselves to see what is often before our very eyes, we click away and continue searching elsewhere.